Airlines Flying to Australia By Capacity


Jumpacked Airlines

All Nippon Airways (Japan) tops the list which has flown the most packed planes at 91% average capacity.  ANA is followed by American Airlines at 88%, closely followed by Delta Air Lines (USA) at 87% seat utilization over the past four years.

Half Empty Planes

Air Niugini (Papua New Guinea) averages 54%, while Philippine carriers Cebu Pacific and Philippine Airlines have an average capacity of 59.5% and 60.1% respectively.

Australian carrier Qantas is at number 19 and flies at an average of 79.9% capacity.

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1 All Nippon Airways 91.3%

2. American Airlines 87.7%

3. Delta Air Lines 87.3%

4. Cathay Pacific Airways 86.5%

5. British Airways 85.6%

6. Etihad Airways 85.3%

7. Japan Airlines 84.3%

8. Aerolineas Argentinas 83.9%

9. Air Canada 82.6%

10. Qatar Airways 82.4%

11. Fiji Airways 81.8%

12. Air New Zealand 81.5%

13. United Airlines 81.4%

14. China Eastern Airlines 80.8%

15. China Southern Airlines 80.5%

16. Singapore Airlines 80.5%

17. Korean Air 80.3%

18. Air China 80.3%

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19. Qantas Airways 79.9%

20. LAN Airlines 78.7%

21. Jetstar 78.3%

22. Virgin Atlantic Airways 78.1%

23. Vietnam Airlines 76.7%

24. Emirates 76.7%

25. Tigerair 76.5%

26. China Airlines 76.2%

27. Xiamen Airlines 76.1%

28. Jetstar Asia 76.0%

29. Asiana Airlines 75.9%

30. Virgin Australia 75.8%

31. Hawaiian Airlines 75.5%

32. AirAsia X 75.1%

33. Air Caledonie International 74.7%

34. Scoot 74.5%

35. Air Caledonie 74.1%

36. Garuda Indonesia 73.0%

37. Silk Air 72.9%

38. South African Airways 72.9%

39. Indonesia AirAsia 72.9%

40. Air India 72.1%

41. Air Mauritius 72.0%

42. Malaysia Airlines 71.8%

43. Thai Airways International 70.0%

44. Royal Brunei Airlines 69.1%

45. Sichuan Airlines 68.4%

46. Indonesia AirAsia Extra 67.4%

47. Malindo Air 63.6%

48. Air Vanuatu 62.3%

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49. Philippine Airlines 60.1%

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50. Cebu Pacific Air 59.5%

51. Air Niugini 54.1%

Source: finder.com.au, bitre.gov.au.

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Xiamen Airlines Flies to Cebu


Xiamen Airlines started its fourth non-stop route between China and the Philippines. On 10 April it introduced twice-weekly (Mon and Fri) flights between Jinjiang – Cebu. Xiamen Airlines flies to Cebu from both Xiamen and Jinjiang.

Cebu Pacific, Philippine Airlines Lose More Than P1B Due To APEC


PHILIPPINE Airlines, Inc. and Cebu Air, Inc. on Tuesday said they stand to lose around P1.2 billion in revenues from the cancellation of more than 1,500 flights resulting from the country’s hosting of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Economic Leaders’ Meeting this week.

“PAL’s foregone or lost revenue due to APEC cancellations is approximately $18.7 million (over P880 million),” PAL Spokesperson Cielo C. Villaluna said in a mobile phone reply yesterday.

PAL President and Chief Operating Officer Jaime J. Bautista added separately via text: “It’s a good estimate of lost revenue.”

Ms. Villaluna said PAL cancelled over 700 flights, which represent more or less 2.5 days of operations, at Manila’s international airport to give way for the arrival and departure of world leaders attending the APEC summit.

The flag carrier operates around 260 flights and generates around $7.5 million in gross revenue daily.

However, Ms. Villaluna noted PAL’s revenue losses will be offset by the long-term benefits from the country’s hosting of the APEC summit.

“We must stress, however, that the long-term benefits of APEC outweigh these aforementioned losses,” the PAL official added.

Meanwhile, Gokongwei-led budget carrier Cebu Air, Inc., which operates Cebu Pacific Air and Cebgo, estimated its revenue losses will hit P400 million from the cancellation of 847 flights this week.

“CEB estimates a revenue loss of P400 million from flight cancellations due to the APEC meeting,” Cebu Pacific Corporate Affairs Officer-in-Charge Paterno S. Mantaring, Jr. said in a separate text reply.

“As there may still be further changes in flight schedules within the week, this figure may still change,” he added.

Philippines AirAsia, which canceled 186 plane trips, has yet to release a figure on foregone revenue.

The airlines had to suspend operations after the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines declared a “no fly zone” to give way to “special operations” for the arrivals and departures of the heads of states.

The agency also declared restrictions on the movement of general aviation aircraft.

Most of the leaders of the 21 APEC member economies have already arrived in Manila, including United States President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping. The two-day APEC summit will begin on Wednesday.

Shares of PAL Holdings fell 2.8% to P4.52 apiece on Tuesday, while Cebu Air shares dropped 0.77% to close at P84.10 apiece.

Source: Daphne J. Magturo, http://www.bworldonline.com

APEC 2015: AirAsia Banks on Philippines After First Airliner Disaster


Air_Asia-logo

MANILA, Philippines – Passenger traffic coming from the Philippines and its local affiliate’s ongoing re-fleeting program will help the Southeast Asia’s biggest budget airline rise next year, after it grappled with its first crash in Indonesia last December, the chief of AirAsia Group said on Tuesday, November 17.

“I am predicting a big year in 2016 and I am very confident Filipinos are going to love our products,” AirAsia Berhad CEO Tony Fernandes told a media roundtable on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) CEO Summit 2015 in Makati City.

Asked how the business has been since its first airliner disaster in Malaysia, Fernandes replied: “We are optimistic. [In terms] of passenger traffic, the Philippines is actually the best.”

‘Best’ passenger traffic

Its third quarter records showed that Philippines AirAsia had a load factor of 84%, a 19 percentage-point increase year on year. Load factor refers to a measure of plane occupancy.

Compared to AirAsia Group’s operations in Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, and India, the Philippines recorded the highest increase in load factor in the third quarter of 2015.

“For fourth quarter, we will make money, which is great and I am super confident going forward,” Fernandes said.

Its parent company AirAsia Berhad recorded MYR1.32 billion (P14.22 billion or $301.40 million) revenue in the second quarter of the year, an inch higher than those of last year, thanks to higher passenger volume.

It was last December 28 when AirAsia Indonesia flight QZ8501 to Singapore crashed, with over 160 people on board gone missing. This was AirAsia Group’s first airliner disaster since its establishment 12 years ago. Some business analysts have then said that the incident could discourage some passengers from using the airline at least in the short term, which would have an impact on its bottom line.

“Load is now trending upwards to pre-QZ8501 levels on sales campaigns and brand recovery efforts. Philippines AirAsia’s re-fleeting plan is also on track where older aircraft that were acquired during the acquisition of Zest Air will be sold or targeted to be returned to third party lessors. This will help the associate to continue reduce its cost further. Network optimisation is in place and the number of agents will also be increased in the Philippines,” Fernandes said.

The local unit of AirAsia operates domestic destinations such as Kalibo (Boracay), Puerto Princesa (Palawan), Tagbilaran (Bohol), Cebu and Tacloban. Its international destination include China and Korea.

Higher capital

Asked if the airline group has plans of increasing its investments in the country, its CEO said: “We will keep discovering new places and new things. It is a challenge here, but there is big prize at the end of the day in the Philippines.”

The shareholders of Philippines AirAsia are investing more money into the airline for next year, increasing the airline’s capital stock to P5 billion ($106.84 million) to fund the lease of 5 more aircraft for 2016.

Philippines AirAsia currently has a capital of P2 billion ($42.75 million).

AirAsia Berhad used to operate in the Philippines through Filipino company AirAsia Philippines (Air Asia, Incorporated), which has a 49% stake in AirAsia Zest (Zest Airways, Incorporated).

Just recently, the Civil Aeronautics Board approved its petition to operate as a single company with just a single certificate. The company is now called Philippines AirAsia, Incorporated.

It, however, has pushed back its $200-million initial public offering (IPO) to first quarter of 2018 from 2016, as it finalizes the streamlining of its operations and re-fleeting of aircraft.

“More investments will come after IPO, but we do not want to announce what we are going to do because as soon as this is on Rappler or Philipine Daily Inquirer, then other airlines will copy us,” Fernandes said.

Master short-haul

The AirAsia chief, meanwhile, hinted that it will continue to focus on operating short-haul flights even after IPO.

“It will probably be the next CEO who looks at long haul, not me. You set the doorsteps of China, Philippines, Japan, and Korea. On the other side you have a 700-million ASEAN market, with most of these people not [having been] to the Philippines yet,” he added.

Asked about AirAsia’s access to the US market, Fernandes replied: “When I run out of that (ASEAN market), then I look at the Americans; But it is complicated — security, [President Barack] Obama… Leave that to PAL (rival Philippine Airlines, Incorporated).”

Source: Chrisee Dela Paz, Rappler.com

No Philippine Carrier in Star Alliance For Now


STAR ALLIANCE, the world’s largest alliance of airlines, said it will not accept a local carrier for now, especially Philippine Airlines, Inc. because it may “cannibalize” existing members.

“There is no immediate need to be focusing on recruiting a member from the Philippines,” Star Alliance Chief Operating Officer Jeffrey Goh told a media briefing yesterday in New World Makati Hotel.

“Clearly, if you just think about the network of Philippine Airlines today, they have overlapping services with some of our members.”

He said before the 28-member bloc accepts a new entrant, they ensure that it will not “cannibalize existing ones.”

Philippine Airlines has yet to respond to a request for comment.

Star Alliance, which targets “high-value international travellers,” sees an opportunity to expand its network in the country, even if growth prospects lies mainly on low-cost carriers.

“Our members are constantly looking at ways to expand the network whenever that is possible,” Mr. Goh said. “Of course, Manila isn’t the center of the earth in a way, that there has to be a very strong proposition for our members to operate in Manila.”

Star Alliance, which is driven by network coverage, currently has no budget airline as its member as these are usually point-to-point carriers.

However, Mr. Goh said they are planning to tie-up with low-cost carriers in India and Brazil under its “connecting partner model.” This is to boost coverage in huge markets where existing members are not present.

The group provides frequent flyers with priority check-in, boarding, and baggage handling, as well as airport lounge access and extra baggage allowance, among others.

At the same time, member airlines benefit through additional revenue generation and cost reduction. They also work on fuel, fleet coordination, co-location and information technology projects.

Source: Daphne J. Magturo, http://www.bworldonline.com

Philippine Airlines Selects Pratt & Whitney PurePower Engines To Power 15 Airbus A321NEO


DUBAI, United Arab Emirates, Nov. 9, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — DUBAI AIR SHOW — Philippine Airlines (PAL), the Philippine flag carrier, has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Pratt & Whitney to power its order of 15 firm plus 15 purchase right A321neo aircraft. Deliveries are scheduled to begin in 2017. Pratt & Whitney is a United Technologies Corp. (NYSE: UTX) company.

“We pride ourselves on the fact that we embrace innovative technology within our aircraft fleet,” said Jaime Bautista, president and chief operating officer, Philippine Airlines.  “The A321neo aircraft with PurePower engines helps us keep our fleet young and modern. With these aircraft, we will be able to reduce our fuel burn and subsequent operating cost, which is great news for our business.”

“Philippine Airlines recognizes Pratt & Whitney’s industry-leading technology, which will provide them exceptional service for many years,” said Greg Gernhardt, president, Pratt & Whitney Commercial Engines. “The PurePower engine has set the precedent in our industry for its fuel burn advantage through delivering a greater than 16 percent fuel burn improvement.”

The PurePower engine family has completed more than 23,000 hours and 40,000 cycles of testing.

As the first airline in Asia, Philippine Airlines has been carrying people to and from the Philippines since 1941. Philippine Airlines has a young and modern fleet of aircraft and a route network that spans 35 foreign cities and 29 domestic points.

Source: http://www.prnewswire.com

CNN: Notable Airline Bombings And Foiled Plots


Image Source: content.time.com

For almost as long as there have been passenger planes, there have been criminals and terrorists who want to bring them down.

The first happened 82 years ago; the most recent definitive incident — twin bombings in Russia — was 11 years ago. And U.S. intelligence suggested Wednesday that an ISIS bomb might have brought down the Russian airliner that crashed in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula.

There also have been several attempts to blow up planes headed to the United States and other plots involving explosives and airliners though the years. Several of the plots involve al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, the terrorist network’s affiliate in Yemen.

Here are some of the most famous bombings and foiled plots in aviation:

October 1933: First suspected bombing

Seven people were on board a United Airlines flight that originated in Newark, New Jersey, and, after a stop in Cleveland, was on its way to Chicago. As it passed over the Indiana town of Chesterton, residents heard a boom. At first people thought it might have been lightning that brought the plane down but evidence pointed toward a bomb planted in the back of the plane, near the lavatory. No suspect was ever named.

May 1962: Suicide by dynamite

Continental Airlines Flight 11 becomes the first U.S. commercial passenger jet to be blown up. It was taking 45 people from Chicago to Los Angeles (with a stop in Kansas City). Investigators fingered Thomas Doty, who purchased hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of life insurance policies before he lit six sticks of dynamite while in the bathroom.

June 1985: Deadliest bombing

Irish sailors unload debris from Air India Flight 182 on June 29, 1985.

A total of 329 people were killed on Air India Flight 182, the deadliest commercial aviation bombing. It was traveling from Toronto to Mumbai (stops in Montreal, London and Delhi) when it disappeared south of Ireland. The bomb went off in a cargo hold while the plane was at 31,000 feet. Both Sikh and Kashmiri terrorists were blamed for the attack. Injerjit Singh Reyat, a Sikh, was the only person convicted. He pleaded guilty to a manslaughter charge but also was later convicted of perjury in another trial.

December 1988: Tragedy over Lockerbie

About 38 minutes after it took off from London, Pan Am Flight 103 was flying at 31,000 feet when a bomb hidden in a Toshiba cassette recorder inside a suitcase exploded. The 259 people on the plane and 11 people on the ground in Lockerbie, Scotland, were killed.

The United States and United Kingdom blamed Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al Megrahi, who was once security chief for Libyan Arab Airlines, and Al Amin Khalifa Fhimah — accusing them both of being Libyan intelligence agents. Libya eventually handed over both men to the United Nations in 1999 and later pay $2.7 billion to victims’ families. Megrahi was convicted while Fhimah was acquitted. In October 2015, Scottish officials announce two unidentified Libyans were new suspects.

November 1989: Pablo’s thugs blow up airliner

Drug kingpin Pablo Escobar and the Medellin drug cartel were blamed for the explosion that caused the crash of Avianca Flight 203. The Boeing 727 left Bogota, Colombia, on a flight to Cali, but a bomb in the cabin and a secondary explosion kill 107 people.

Most accounts say the intended target, presidential candidate Cesar Gaviria, changed his plans at the last minute and was not on the plane. Other reports said one of Escobar’s top assassins, Dandeny Munoz-Mosquera, arranged the bombing to kill two informants. Because two Americans were killed, the U.S. prosecuted and convicted Munoz-Mosquera on murder charges after he was arrested in New York.

August 2004: Twin bombings

Two Russian airliners were destroyed by midair bombs on August 24. Eighty-nine people died in the crashes, and a few days later, Russia’s security service blamed the explosions on terrorists. According to Russian news agencies, two Chechen women became the focus of suspicion. Investigators confirmed traces of hexogen were found in the wreckage. Hexogen, when mixed with nitroglycerin, forms a plastic explosive similar to C4 and had been used by Chechen rebels in attacks on Russian soil.

FOILED PLOTS

January 1995 : ‘Project Bojinka’

Ramzi Yousef, Abdul Hakim Murad and Wali Khan Amin Shah plotted to blow up 12 U.S. airliners originating from the Philippines and elsewhere in East Asia. The planes were to explode over the Pacific Ocean in a plot called “Project Bojinka.” Yousef was convicted in 1996 for the plot and for planting a test bomb on a Philippines Airlines jet bound for Tokyo on December 11, 1994.

He boarded the airliner in Manila under an assumed name, put the device under a seat and left the plane during a layover. The bomb exploded during the next leg of the flight, killing one passenger and injuring 10 others, but the plane remained intact and was able to make an emergency landing in Okinawa, Japan. Yousef was also convicted of the 1993 bombings at the World Trade Center in New York that killed six people.

December 2001: Shoe bomber

Richard Reid, a heavily traveled British citizen of Jamaican heritage, was accused of trying to light explosives in his sneakers with a match aboard American Airlines Flight 63 from Paris to Miami on December 22. Flight attendants and passengers prevented him from doing so, and the plane was diverted to Boston with a military escort. No one on the plane is hurt.

August 2006: Trans-Atlantic plot

Two weeks before the plot was to be launched, British officials arrested 24 people in a plan to bring down airliners traveling from Heathrow Airport in London to the United States. The plot involved hiding liquid explosives in soft-drink bottles, and as many as 10 flights would have been targeted, U.S. officials said. Ten men, including ringleader Abdulla Ahmed Ali and bomb chemist Assad Sarwar, were convicted. A few days before his arrest, Ali was monitored looking up flights from Heathrow to North America that would be in the air at the same time.

December 2009: Underwear bomber

Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab tried to blow up a Northwest Airlines flight carrying 290 people from Amsterdam, Netherlands, to Detroit on Christmas Day with explosives placed in his underwear. The device failed to detonate fully, instead setting off a fire at his seat.

The bomb components allegedly included Pentaerythritol (also known as PETN, a high explosive), as well as Triacetone Triperoxide (also known as TATP, a high explosive) and other ingredients. He was subdued and restrained by the passengers and flight crew after trying to detonate the bomb. The airplane landed shortly thereafter, and he was taken into custody by U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers. Authorities linked Abdul Mutallab to al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula

October 2010: Printer toner bombs

Authorities in the United Arab Emirates and Britain found two explosive-laden packages sent from Yemen that were addressed to synagogues in Chicago. The devices, loaded with the PETN, are packed in computer printer toner cartridges and designed to be detonated by a cell phone, a U.S. source close to the investigation said.

Another U.S. official said the devices found in the packages were very sophisticated and could have exploded in flight, but it wasn’t clear whether that was the intent. Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula claimed responsibility.

May 2012: AQAP tries another bomb

U.S. and other intelligence agencies broke up a plot by terrorists in Yemen to slip a bomb past airport metal detectors and onto an airplane bound for the United States. The bomb was seized before it made it to an airport and posed no real threat to air travelers.

It was similar to, but more sophisticated than, the device discovered in a failed attempt to bring down a Detroit-bound airliner on Christmas Day in 2009. The bomb also appeared to be the work of al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, U.S. officials say.

Source:

Local Airlines Get New Slots Despite Congestion


Despite the congestion at Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA), the government has allocated new slots to all domestic airlines that would enable them to add more flights.

However, the  flights would have to be mounted at night as slots during peak hours in the morning and in the afternoon are all used up.

In industry parlance, a slot is  defined as the allowable movement of a plane,  either a takeoff or a landing.

Airline executives said they can only use so much of these additional slots for domestic destinations since not all airports in the country have night landing operations. If at all, most of these slots would have to be used for international flights.

Jose Angel A. Honrado, Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA)
general manager, in a phone interview said the agency has allocated more than 1,000 new slots per week to  Philippine Airlines,  Cebu Pacific and its unit CEB Go, PAL Express and Philippines Air Asia .

The new slots can be used for both international and domestic flights until March next year .

Currently, NAIA’s runway accommodates 40 events (take off and landing per hour), still manageable though beyond the designed capacity of an average of 36 events per hour.  This is to accommodate the growing volume of passengers which is  to reach more than 35 million this year.

Local airlines have said  congestion at NAIA has hampered their domestic expansion.

Jaime Bautista, PAL president,  said most of the airline’s expansion have been focused on flights originating from Cebu such as those going to Nagoya, Osaka and Narita.

PAL has also started flying out of Cebu to other key domestic airports like Davao and  Iloilo.

By next year, PAL will start flying from Cebu to Los Angeles, California , Philippine Air Asia, which  operates a fleet of purely Airbus 320s, said its expansion plan in the domestic market has also been hampered by infrastructure limitation as only few airports in the country can accommodate big-sized  aircraft.

To increase NAIA’s air  traffic movements from 40 to 60 events in the next six months, the Department of Transportation and Communications (DOTC) tapped the British firm joint venture of NATS Services Limited and Schema Konsult, Inc. as a temporary solution to ease congestion at NAIA.

For the long-term, however, DOTC is eyeing to  build a new Manila international airport  to avert further congestion in the next five years.

“ The  DOTC  and the MIAA have  said  the existing  Manila airport no matter what they do will max out its capacity by 2022 and 2023. We need a final decision on where we should locate the new Manila international airport,” said Rogelio Singson, secretary of the  Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH).

Noriaki Niwa, chief representative in the Philippines of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), said the feasibility study for the new Manila airport will be completed by January or February next year once President Aquino finalizes the decision on the location of the airport this year.

The feasibility study would determine the project cost, design and implementation of the project.

From five, the number of proposed sites for the new airport has narrowed down to two: the central Manila Bay   area worth  $13 billion and Sangley Point in Cavite,  $10 billion.

To address the anticipated growing traffic at the country’s main hub, JICA has suggested to build a new airport near NAIA.

Image Source: Rappler.com

The new airport would address the anticipated passenger growth which  projected to reach 37.8 million in  2015;  47.8 million in 2020; 59 million in 2015; 71.6 million by 2030; 85.6 million by 2035 and 101 million by 2040.

Source: Myla Iglesias, http://malaya.com.ph

Philippines AirAsia Prepares Direct Flights To Tokyo


BUDGET carrier Philippines AirAsia is planning to launch direct flights to Tokyo, Japan by winter next year, a company official said.

With the airline’s bagging the utilized entitlements previously allocated to Philippine Airlines (PAL), it may now start flying to the premier airport in Japan. But for now, the company will be focusing on developing its route network tin China for the first half of next year.

The Japanese expansion will come in by the second half of 2016.

“We will launch Japan late next year, around winter time. We will focus on our China routes in the first half,” AirAsia Philippines CEO Joy D. Caneba said in an interview.

The carrier of taipan Lucio C. Tan previously held all 14 entitlements to Haneda Airport in Japan, but only half of those were utilized.

“We will fly to Tokyo via Haneda. If I wasn’t able to swing the deal, I might go for Narita,” Caneba said.

Haneda, also known as Tokyo International Airport, is one of the two premier airports servicing the Greater Tokyo Area. It is considered the world’s most slot-restrictive airport and a prime business hub.

The airport, which is around 30 minutes from the Tokyo metropolis, has one domestic and two international passenger terminals and connects conveniently to the Tokyo monorail.

Japan is the third-largest contributor to tourist arrivals in the Philippines with 334,881 visitors as of end-August, data from the Department of Tourism showed. Japanese visitors contributed P1.44 billion in tourism receipts in August alone.

Source: Lorenz S. Marasigan, http://www.businessmirror.com.ph

Philippine Airlines Cancels Flights Due To APEC


philippine-airlines

INTERNATIONAL FLIGHTS

15 November 2015 (Sunday)
PR422/421 MANILA- TOKYO (HANEDA)-MANILA
PR330/331 MANILA-XIAMEN-MANILA

16 November 2015 (Monday)
PR438 MANILA-NAGOYA
PR432 MANILA-TOKYO (NARITA)
PR213 MANILA-SYDNEY

17 November 2015 (Tuesday)
PR214 SYDNEY-MANILA
PR437 NAGOYA-MANILA
PR431 TOKYO (NARITA)-MANILA
PR330/331 MANILA-XIAMEN-MANILA
PR356/357 MANILA-JINJIANG-MANILA
PR656/657 MANILA-ABU DHABI-MANILA
PR338/339 MANILA-SHANGHAI (PUDONG)-MANILA
PR424 MANILA-TOKYO (HANEDA)
PR312 MANILA-HONGKONG
PR306 MANILA-HONGKONG
PR301 HONGKONG-MANILA
PR432 MANILA-TOKYO (NARITA)
PR318/319 MANILA-HONGKONG-MANILA
PR736/737 MANILA-BANGKOK-MANILA
PR732/733 MANILA-BANGKOK-MANILA
PR511/502 MANILA-SINGAPORE-MANILA
PR507/508 MANILA-SINGAPORE-MANILA
PR501/512 MANILA-SINGAPORE-MANILA
PR438/437 MANILA-NAGOYA-MANILA
PR100/101 MANILA-HONOLULU-MANILA
PR591/592 MANILA-SAIGON-MANILA
PR358/359 MANILA-BEIJING-MANILA
PR896/897 MANILA-TAIPEI-MANILA
PR418/419 MANILA-BUSAN (PUSAN)-MANILA
PR 468 MANILA-SEOUL (INCHEON) I
PR 467 SEOUL (INCHEON)-MANILA
PR682 /683 MANILA-DAMMAM-MANILA

18 November 2015 (Wednesday)
PR539/540 MANILA-JAKARTA-MANILA
PR730/731 MANILA-BANGKOK-MANILA
PR312 MANILA-HONGKONG
PR426/425 MANILA-FUKUOKA-MANILA
PR318/319 MANILA-HONGKONG-MANILA
PR507/508 MANILA-SINGAPORE-MANILA
PR423 TOKYO (HANEDA)-MANILA
PR313 HONGKONG-MANILA
PR213 MANILA-SYDNEY
PR428/427 MANILA-TOKYO (NARITA)-MANILA
PR431 TOKYO (NARITA)-MANILA

19 November 2015 (Thursday)
PR214 SYDNEY-MANILA
PR424/423 MANILA-TOKYO (HANEDA)-MANILA
PR732/733 MANILA-BANGKOK-MANILA
PR313 HONGKONG-MANILA
PR312 MANILA-HONGKONG
PR428/427 MANILA-NARITA-MANILA
PR507/508 MANILA-SINGAPORE-MANILA
PR656-657 MANILA-ABU DHABI-MANILA
PR356-357 MANILA-JINJIANG-MANILA

20 November 2015 (Friday)
PR422/421 MANILA-TOKYO (HANEDA)-MANILA
PR100/101 MANILA-HONOLULU-MANILA
PR318/319 MANILA-HONGKONG-MANILA
PR313 HONGKONG-MANILA
PR730/731 MANILA-BANGKOK-MANILA
PR426/425 MANILA-FUKUOKA-MANILA
PR507/508 MANILA-SINGAPORE-MANILA
PR656/657 MANILA-ABU DHABI-MANILA

DOMESTIC FLIGHTS

15 November 2015 (Sunday)
PR 1823/1824 MANILA – DAVAO – MANILA

17 November 2015 (Tuesday)
PR 2925/2926 MANILA – LEGAZPI – MANILA
PR 2927/2928 MANILA – LEGAZPI – MANILA
PR 2043/2044 MANILA – CATICLAN – MANILA
PR 2051/2052 MANILA – CATICLAN – MANILA
PR 2059/2060 MANILA – CATICLAN – MANILA
PR 2041/2042 MANILA – CATICLAN – MANILA
PR 2049/2050 MANILA – CATICLAN – MANILA
PR 2053/2054 MANILA – CATICLAN – MANILA
PR 1811/1812 MANILA – DAVAO – MANILA
PR 1815/1816 MANILA – DAVAO – MANILA
PR 1819/1820 MANILA – DAVAO – MANILA
PR 2031/2032 MANILA – BUSUANGA -MANILA
PR 2033/2034 MANILA – BUSUANGA – MANILA
PR 1849/1850 MANILA – CEBU – MANILA
PR 1853/1854 MANILA – CEBU – MANILA
PR 1861/1862 MANILA – CEBU – MANILA
PR 1863/1864 MANILA – CEBU – MANILA
PR 2557/2558 MANILA – DIPOLOG – MANILA
PR 2521/2522 MANILA – CAGAYAN DE ORO – MANILA
PR 2527/2528 MANILA – CAGAYAN DE ORO – MANILA
PR 2265/2266 MANILA – NAGA – MANILA
PR 2261/2262 MANILA – NAGA – MANILA
PR 2131/2132 MANILA – BACOLOD – MANILA
PR 2133/2134 MANILA – BACOLOD – MANILA
PR 2135/2136 MANILA – BACOLOD – MANILA
PR 2785/2786 MANILA – PUERTO PRINCESA – MANILA
PR 2787/2788 MANILA – PUERTO PRINCESA – MANILA
PR 2969/2970 MANILA – KALIBO – MANILA
PR 2975/2976 MANILA – KALIBO – MANILA
PR 2141/2142 MANILA – ILOILO – MANILA
PR 2143/2144 MANILA – ILOILO – MANILA
PR 2145/2146 MANILA – ILOILO – MANILA
PR 2997/2998 MANILA – ZAMBOANGA – MANILA
PR 2196/2197 MANILA – LAOAG- MANILA
PR 2545/2546 MANILA – DUMAGUETE – MANILA
PR2543/2544 MANILA – DUMAGUETE – MANILA
PR2014/2015 MANILA – TUGUEGARAO – MANILA
PR 2777/2778 MANILA – TAGBILARAN – MANILA
PR 453/454 MANILA – GENERAL SANTOS – MANILA

18 November 2015 (Wednesday)
PR 1813/1814 MANILA – DAVAO – MANILA
PR 2521/2522 MANILA – CAGAYAN DE ORO – MANILA
PR 2925/2926 MANILA – LEGAZPI – MANILA
PR 1863/1864 MANILA – CEBU – MANILA

19 November 2015 (Thursday)
PR 2053/2054 MANILA – CATICLAN – MANILA
PR 2145/2146 MANILA – ILOILO – MANILA
PR 1819/1820 MANILA – DAVAO – MANILA
PR 2971/2972 MANILA – KALIBO – MANILA
PR 2975/2976 MANILA – KALIBO – MANILA
PR 2014/2015 MANILA – TUGUEGARAO – MANILA
PR 2135/2136 MANILA – BACOLOD – MANILA
PR 1861/1862 MANILA – CEBU – MANILA

20 November 2015 (Friday)
PR 2051/2052 MANILA – CATICLAN – MANILA
PR 2265/2266 MANILA – NAGA – MANILA
PR 1849/1850 MANILA – CEBU – MANILA

Cebu Pacific Cancelled Flights:
Philippines Air Asia Cancelled Flights